Test Your Network Connection

Google has added some capabilities (via collaborations) that, when fully operational, will allow you to do some pretty detailed testing of your Internet connection. 

See this article for all the information (well, not all, but, some pretty good stuff).  One of my heros from my college days when I was learning communication technology,Vint Cerf, has something to do with this.  🙂

I have mentioned in previous blogs that if Internet providers impose limits on access; watching movies via the Internet could be adversely affected.  

Here is the link to the test site.  

The information could be especially helpful to those of us who videoconference and want the best video quality we can get.  One question you might ask is:  Is your provider providing the upstream bit rate you are paying for?  In my case I am paying for 384 kbps upstream.  

I tried a few tests and only one worked.  This may be due to traffic, or we may be a bit early and they may not have all the pieces in place.  Technology takes time.  🙂

TelBitConsulting says:  This is interesting, and useful, information for customers who want to know more about their network connectivity.  And it couldn’t come at a better time.  

Quick Test

I ran a quick test to see if my DSL provider (AT&T) was limiting BitTorrent traffic on my line.  Note, according to the BitTorrent web site, it’s technology is:  “the global standard for accessing rich media over the Internet.”

Here are the results:

Is BitTorrent traffic on a well-known BitTorrent port (6881) throttled?

* The BitTorrent upload (seeding) worked. Our tool was successful in uploading data using the BitTorrent protocol.

* There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits your BitTorrent uploads. In our tests a TCP upload achieved minimal 389 Kbps while a BitTorrent upload achieved maximal 394 Kbps. 

* The BitTorrent download worked. Our tool was successful in downloading data using the BitTorrent protocol.

* There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits your BitTorrent downloads. In our tests a TCP download achieved minimal 636 Kbps while a BitTorrent download achieved maximal 641 Kbps.

Is BitTorrent traffic on a non-standard BitTorrent port (10009) throttled?

* The BitTorrent upload (seeding) worked. Our tool was successful in uploading data using the BitTorrent protocol.

* There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits your BitTorrent uploads. In our tests a TCP download achieved minimal 384 Kbps while a BitTorrent download achieved maximal 389 Kbps.

* The BitTorrent download worked. Our tool was successful in downloading data using the BitTorrent protocol.

* There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits your BitTorrent downloads. In our tests a TCP download achieved minimal 629 Kbps while a BitTorrent download achieved maximal 640 Kbps.

Is TCP traffic on a well-known BitTorrent port (6881) throttled?

* There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits all downloads at port 6881. In our test, a TCP download on a BitTorrent port achieved at least 636 Kbps while a TCP download on a non-BitTorrent port achieved at least 629 Kbps.

* There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits all uploads at port 6881. In our test, a TCP upload on a BitTorrent port achieved at least 389 Kbps while a TCP upload on a non-BitTorrent port achieved at least 384 Kbps.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s